CANINE MOT

Canine hydrotherapy

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Athletic, show and working dogs need to be in tip-top condition to achieve their best results.

While humans consider physiotherapy to be part of our every-day health maintenance and well-being, only now is this an option for high performance canines.

Physiotherapy dog agility Physiotherapy flyball Physiotherapy service dogs Physiotherapy showdogs

Agility

Flyball

Service

Show Dogs

Physiotherapy cani-cross Physiotherapy greyhound racing Physiotherapy gundogs Physiotherapy obedience dogs

Cani-cross

Grey Hound Racing

Gun Dogs

Obedience

 

Each canine discipline brings its own particular areas of stress. For example Agility dogs ‘power’ from the rear-end, in contrast Cani-cross makes extensive use of front-end muscles. Flyball and Greyhound dogs are subject to high stresses on their carpal (wrist) joints.

For show dogs even muscle tone across the whole body is a critical factor to good ring performance. Similarly Gundogs use all their body to jump, run and swim in the field. For Obedience reducing neck muscle tension will help prolong the dog’s top performance. Understanding slight and early muscles strains in a service dog can help prevent expensive longer term layoffs in the future.

Benefits of our MOT Assessments:

  1. Hands on identification areas of specific areas of possible muscle tension
  2.  Objective assessment of balance and joint range of motion
  3. Gait analysis to visualise your dog’s foot placement
  4. Option of follow-up veterinary referred full physiotherapy treatment sessions

 

The SmartPaws dog MOT is designed to work in collaboration with your veterinary to provide a holistic plan for your hard working four legged best friend.

The MOT programe has 3 optional levels. Ranging from level 1 when as the handler you just know that ‘something is not right’ to our 3rd level where your veterinary has made the diagnosis and your beloved companion is ready for an in-depth physiotherapy session.

  

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Agility Dogs

 

When landing from a 65cm height hurdle, an Agility dog will exert some 45 N/kg of body Mass in the landing forelimbs.

Coupled with force required to takeoff, coupled with negotiating the contact equipment and weaves, areas of strain include the:

  • Wrist
  • Shoulder
  • Groin
  • Lumbar
  • Rear leg muscles.

Click on the targets opposite for typical injuries and the role physiotherapy can play in helping to overcome these issues. 

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Agility PhysiotherapyIliopsoas strains 

are often caused by over-stretching during athletic activitiesThe lumbar area is 

subject to high stress due to flexing of the spine during jumpingABCShoulderHamstring
   

 

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Flyball

 

Flyball is an exceptionally high speed sport involving multiple repetitive movements.

This repetition includes skills such as sprinting, turning and jumping which puts the following areas under stress:

  • Wrist
  • Neck
  • Spine
  • Abdominals
  • Hip

Click on the targets opposite for typical injuries and the role physiotherapy can play in helping to overcome these issues.

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Flyball Physiotherapy Abdominals Spine ABCNeckHip
   

 

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Service Dogs

 

Service and Search and Rescue dogs spend a long time in the field working.

 

They need to maintain a steady gait and extended neck to cover the ground and screen large areas. This can put strain on the following joints:

  • Wrist
  • Elbow
  • Shoulder
  • Stifle
  • Hock

 

Click on the targets opposite for typical injuries and the role physiotherapy can play to help maintain these joints to optimise the dogs working capabilities:

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Show Dogs

 

Show dogs need to display fluidity in movement. For this reason optimisation of the forelimb, hindlimb and ‘top line’ muscles and joints is imperative.

Physiotherapy can aid forelimb reach, hindlimb drive and smooth deceleration, factors which will improve ring performance.

Attention will be focused on the areas of the:

  • Neck
  • Shoulder
  • Spine
  • Rear leg muscles.

The targets opposite represent the primary areas that physiotherapy can focus on to maintain the Show dog in top condition.

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Show dog PhysiotherapyNeckSpineShoulder Rear Limb
   

 

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Cani-cross

 

Cani-cross dogs need long and thin muscle cells to help with this endurance sport.

Maintaining these cells in optimum condition can help prevent inury or facilitate a quicker rehabilitation period.

Typically Cani-cross dogs will be particularly use these muscle groups;

  • Neck
  • Pectorals
  • Shoulder
  • Hip
  • Hamstring

 

Click on the targets opposite for typical injuries and the role physiotherapy can play in helping to overcome these issues.

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Grey Hound Racing

 

Muscle strains in the racing Greyhound can occur when the muscle is activated during by powerful eccentric contraction.

These strains vary from a partial to a
complete rupture. The former are typically treated with conservative physiotherapy treatmentts.

Areas commonoly strained include the:

  • Wrist
  • Tricep
  • TFL
  • Gracilis
  • Rear leg muscles

Click on the targets opposite for typical injuries and the role physiotherapy can play in helping to overcome these issues.

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Gun Dogs

 

Together with durability from long days working, gun and field dog work requires a combination of quick turns, acceleration and deceleration.

These manoeuvres require the use of all the dog's main muscle groups.

In order to optimise performance, the following muscle groups need particular attention:

  • Neck
  • Forelimb
  • Shoulder
  • Spine
  • Rear leg muscles

Click on the targets opposite for typical injuries and the role physiotherapy can play in helping to overcome these issues.

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Obedience

 

 

Competitive obedience dictates constant attention from the dog on the handler.

This requires the neck to be in a constant fixed position. Additionally the remainder of the body must move effortlessly and fluidly.

In order to achieve optimum performance, the muscles which support the:

  • Neck
  • Shoulder
  • Spine
  • Hip

need particular attention.

Click on the targets opposite for typical injuries and the role physiotherapy can play in helping to overcome these issues.

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